Astoria Performing Arts Center names new boss

Erin Moore is the new executive director of the Astoria Performing Arts Center.  Photo courtesy APAC

Erin Moore is the new executive director of the Astoria Performing Arts Center. Photo courtesy APAC

After a nearly year-long search, the Astoria Performing Arts Center’s board of directors announced Erin Moore has been tapped as its new executive director. 

“I am thrilled to be joining APAC as the new executive director,” Moore said. “It is an honor to be entrusted with the responsibility of maintaining APAC’s legacy of excellence and continuing its integral role in the cultural community of Astoria and Long Island City.”

Since its founding in 2001, the APAC has produced revivals of musicals and plays as well as introducing audiences to new works, like last year’s world premiere of Sandy Rustin’s “The Cottage.”

The company runs its office out of the Kaufman Astoria Studios and produces its shows at Good Shepherd United Methodist Church on Crescent Street near 30th Road.

“I am personally excited to become a part of this vibrant theatrical community, as I get to know the artists, artisans, and audiences who have been part of the APAC family for so many years, as well as the new faces the coming months and years will bring to APAC’s performances and community programs,” Moore said. 

Take a step back to 1964

Warhol's Brillo pad pieces will also be part of the Queens Museum exhibit. Photo courtesy Andy Warhol Museum

Warhol’s Brillo pad pieces will also be part of the Queens Museum exhibit. Photo courtesy Andy Warhol Museum

When you think 1964 World’s Fair you probably envision the Unisphere, the three towers from the New York State Pavilion –which later appeared in “Men in Black”–and the “Pepsi Presents Walt Disney’s ‘It’s a Small World’” ride.

But maybe you should consider Andy Warhol’s contribution.

Warhol’s only commissioned piece of public art was a series of screens printed directly onto the walls of the NY State Pavilion depicting the NYPD’s 13 Most Wanted Men.

But fair organizers balked at the last second and covered his works with silver paint the night before the event opened to the public April 22, 1964.

Luckily, Warhol made prints of his screens before he destroyed them. Now, nine of those prints will be on display at the Queens Museum beginning April 27.

The exhibit is a joint venture between the Queens Museum and the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh and will include other Warhol works all from 1964, the year he opened The Factory.

 

Breezy Point singer crowned best of Queens

Annika Scilipote won first place in the Queens brackets of the Battle of the Boroughs.  Photo courtesy Matthew Septimus

Annika Scilipote won first place in the Queens brackets of the Battle of the Boroughs. Photo courtesy Matthew Septimus

Once the dust settled and the last chord sounded, singer/songwriter Annika Scilipote was crowned the Queens winner in the Battle of the Boroughs.

The 16-year-old Breezy Point resident now moves on to the finals this summer.

The dozen Queens performers kicked off this year’s competition at the Jerome L. Greene Performance space in SoHo.

Each act played a five-minute set for the the three judges. The judges decisions paired with a round of online voting by fans and friends of the performers ended with the top five vote getters.

Besides Scilipote, the other finalists included Astoria’s Tati Ana, Elmhurst-based rock band Born of Scars, Astoria’s Nick Moran and South Richmond Hill’s Jessica Rowboat.

The battle continues in Soho with musicians from the other four boroughs competing for a chance to take on Scilipote in the June 27 finals.

Queens high school singers ready for Carnegie Hall concert

Forest Hills High School senior Benjamin Abjierov rehearses for this weekend's concert at Carnegie Hall.  Photo courtesy of Richard Termine

Forest Hills High School senior Benjamin Abjierov rehearses for this weekend’s concert at Carnegie Hall. Photo courtesy of Richard Termine

The old joke, “How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice, practice, practice,” could now sport a new punch line.

Although preparation and rehearsal remain key to headlining at Carnegie, it does not hurt your chances if you attend Astoria’s Frank Sinatra School of the Arts or Forest Hills High School.

This weekend, students from both Queens’ schools will perform selections from Duke Ellington’s Sacred Music Project in the venerable hall’s Stern Auditorium.

Besides the students, professional singers, musicians and dancers will take part in the March 23 show.

The choirs include students from Celia Cruz Bronx High School of Music, the Upper Eastside’s Talent Unlimited High School and Harlem’s Wadleigh Secondary School for the Performing and Visual Arts as well as Forest Hills and Frank Sinatra. Performers from the Jazz at Lincoln Center Youth Orchestra provide the music.

The concert takes place this Sunday, March 23, at 3 p.m.

Bayside has street art all locked up

Someone attached about a dozen locks with written messages to the fence at the Bayside LIRR station.

Someone attached about a dozen locks with written messages to the fence at the Bayside LIRR station.

OK.  We’ll bite.

Leaving the Port Washington-bound train at the Bayside stop this morning, we encountered about a dozen locks in various shapes and sizes attached to the fence over the tracks on Bell Boulevard.

On the face of each lock, someone has written things like “Toots,” “Smile!” and “Glitter Girl” in black Sharpie.

We’re not sure what the person was trying to say –maybe they feel locked out of the city’s art scene out here in the burbs–but it definitely got our attention.

Let’s us know what you think. And if you’re the creator, tell us what it means.

All the world’s their stage over at LaGuardia CC

LaGuardia Community College student Julio Trinidad won the Kennedy Center's American College Theater Festival regionals and now heads to the finals in Washington.  Photo courtesy LaGuardia Community College

LaGuardia Community College student Julio Trinidad won the Kennedy Center’s American College Theater Festival regionals and now heads to the finals in Washington. Photo courtesy LaGuardia Community College

LaGuardia Community College students have been acting up lately.

Julio Trinidad won the Kennedy Center’s American College Theater Festival northeast regional acting competition — try saying that five times fast.

The aspiring actor earned a $500 scholarship, an invitation to compete at the nationals in Dee Cee later this spring,  plus a $1,200 scholarship to the Commonwealth Shakespeare Co.’s Summer Intensive in Boston.

Trinidad was not the only LaGuardia student to make a splash at the competition.

John Cosentino made it to the final round and Toni Ryan was a semi-finalist.

Yuka Taga so impressed the judges with her reading of a one-woman student play, they created an award on the spot — Best Performance in a New Play — and presented it to her.

A different kind of street artist in Woodside

This painting, signed by Edgar Lopez, was hanging on a bus stop sign near the Woodside subway station Friday morning.

This painting, signed by Edgar Lopez, was hanging on a bus stop sign near the Woodside subway station Friday morning.

As we waited for the connecting LIRR train at Woodside Friday morning, we dashed across the road for our second iced coffee of the day.

On the way back to the station from Dunkin’ Donuts,  we noticed this painting attached to the bus stop sign on the corner of 61st Street and Roosevelt Avenue.

An homage to The Beatles’ “Abbey Road” album cover, the work is signed Edgar Lopez.

We’re not sure if Lopez placed the piece there, or if someone else is spreading the word about this artist and his work.

If you know who hung the picture there, let us know. And, if you’re Lopez, drop us a line about where else we can check out your work.