Take a step back to 1964

Warhol's Brillo pad pieces will also be part of the Queens Museum exhibit. Photo courtesy Andy Warhol Museum

Warhol’s Brillo pad pieces will also be part of the Queens Museum exhibit. Photo courtesy Andy Warhol Museum

When you think 1964 World’s Fair you probably envision the Unisphere, the three towers from the New York State Pavilion –which later appeared in “Men in Black”–and the “Pepsi Presents Walt Disney’s ‘It’s a Small World'” ride.

But maybe you should consider Andy Warhol’s contribution.

Warhol’s only commissioned piece of public art was a series of screens printed directly onto the walls of the NY State Pavilion depicting the NYPD’s 13 Most Wanted Men.

But fair organizers balked at the last second and covered his works with silver paint the night before the event opened to the public April 22, 1964.

Luckily, Warhol made prints of his screens before he destroyed them. Now, nine of those prints will be on display at the Queens Museum beginning April 27.

The exhibit is a joint venture between the Queens Museum and the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh and will include other Warhol works all from 1964, the year he opened The Factory.

 

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